Pol­i­tics in the Pub (Syd­ney) tomor­row

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THE BURDEN OF DEBT: HOW SERIOUS & WHO WILL PAY?”

Speak­ers [each giv­ing 20 minute talks on the topic]:

  • Dr Jim Stan­ford, Cana­dian Auto Work­ers Union, author of ‘Eco­nom­ics for Every­one’ and pre­sen­ter of last year’s Ted Wheel­wright lec­ture at the Uni­ver­sity of Syd­ney.
  • Asso­ciate Pro­fes­sor Steve Keen, Uni­ver­sity of West­ern Syd­ney, author of DeBunk­ing Eco­nom­ics and recently well pub­li­cised walker to the top of Mount Kosiosko.
  • Chair: Frank Stil­well

Date: Fri­day, May 14, 2010

Time: 6:00pm – 7.30pm

Loca­tion: Gaelic Club, Level 1 upstairs/lift, 64 Devon­shire Street, Surry Hills, Syd­ney

I should have posted details of this ear­lier! I look for­ward to meet­ing any­one on the blog who can make it along.

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  • Mar­co2

    That sounds much more like my kind of thing (as opposed to walk­ing!): talk­ing about eco­nom­ics and pol­i­tics, with union peo­ple, sundry left­ies, and other inter­est­ing peo­ple, while enjoy­ing a beer (well, maybe more than one).

    Unfor­tu­nately, that’s where I have to curse my being a pro­le­tar­ian: I have to work while oth­ers have fun.

    Any­way, have fun every­one.

  • noah cross

    Dr Jim Stan­ford made a joke at the talk about deriv­a­tives trade in the bar at the Gaelic Club.

    Here it is: http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE62N51X20100324?feedType=RSS&feedName=oddlyEnoughNews&rpc=22&sp=true

    The Exchange Bar & Grill, set amid the bustling shops and pubs of the Gram­mercy Park neigh­bor­hood, is replete with a ticker tape flash­ing menu prices in red let­ter­ing as demand forces them to fluc­tu­ate.

    Cus­tomers can move prices for all bev­er­ages and bar snacks such as hot wings ($7 for 6 pieces) or fried cala­mari ($9). The prices will fluc­tu­ate in $.25 cent incre­ments, but will most likely plateau at a $2 change in either direc­tion.

    A glass of Guin­ness starts at $6 but could be pushed to a high of $8 or a low of $4, depend­ing on pop­u­lar­ity”